Student Success Act (HR 5) – CEF Charts and More

February 6, 2015  |  No Comments  |  by Brenda Arredondo  |  Charts and Factsheets

To download the PDF’s of these charts, click on the images.

Programs Authorized in the Student Success Act (HR 5) (in thousands of $)

cef in $

Programs Authorized in the Student Success Act (HR 5)

(as introduced on February 3, 2015)

Programs Authorized in the Student Success Act (HR 5)

President’s FY 2016 budget – resources and more (updated Feb. 25)

February 2, 2015  |  No Comments  |  by Brenda Arredondo  |  Charts and Factsheets

CEF’s FY 2016 funding table (updated Feb. 6). See below.

This includes funding for most ED programs as well as related programs in HHS and IMLS from FY 2012 (pre-sequester) through the President’s FY 2016 budget. It has more details than the ED table, since it includes extensive footnotes with details from the Congressional Justifications.

Click on the image to download the PDF.

Untitled

CEF Budget History Charts: We just updated our budget history charts, showing yearly funding for most programs from FY 2002 through the President’s FY 2016 budget.

Links to Budget Documents and Reactions:

ESEA Chapter 2/Title VI/Title V (CEF Chart)

February 1, 2015  |  No Comments  |  by Brenda Arredondo  |  Charts and Factsheets

 

cef

 

(Complied by CEF from Education Department budget tables)

 

Click the image to download the PDF of the chart.

Yearly Budget Authority funding levels between Fiscal Year (FY) 2002 and FY 2015

December 15, 2014  |  No Comments  |  by Broddy  |  Charts and Factsheets

The following charts provide yearly Budget Authority funding levels between Fiscal Year (FY) 2002 and FY 2015 for the U.S. Department of Education discretionary funded programs and Head Start in the Department of Health and Human Services.

 

Click here to download the full packet

See an example of what you can expect within:

chart

Items of note:

The final FY 13 levels reflect an across-the-board cut of 0.2% from the levels set in the Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act. These levels were then reduced by the 5.0% sequester cuts. The final FY 13 levels generally represent a cut of 5.23% below FY 12 (except for programs such as Head Start which received a specific pre-sequester increase in the FY 13 CR).

Under sequestration, FY 13 total discretionary funding for the Department of Education (excluding Pell grants) was at its lowest level since FY 2004.

The FY 2014 omnibus appropriations bill only partially restored the sequester cuts, leaving total discretionary funding for the Department of Education (excluding Pell grants) below the FY 2006 level.

The FY 2015 CRomnibus increased total discretionary funding for the Department of Education (excluding Pell grants) by $137 million, but that still leaves that level below FY 2006.

 

FY 2015 Education funding table with omnibus

December 11, 2014  |  No Comments  |  by Broddy  |  Charts and Factsheets

CEF has created a table on education and related programs funding levels in the omnibus.

It highlights the Fiscal Year 2015 Discretionary Funding for Selected Department of Education and Related Programs.

Download the full document, here: FY 2015 Education funding table with omnibus (2)

Page 1 is provided below, for an example of what you can expect in the full document.

chart pic

 

 

STOP THE LARGEST EDUCATION FUNDING CUTS EVER!!

March 7, 2013  |  No Comments  |  by Broddy  |  Charts and Factsheets

 Unless Congress acts, on March 1, 2013 all federally-funded education programs (other than Pell grants which is exempt from the first year cut) will be subject to a 5 percent automatic across-the-board cut as part of an overall $85 billion sequestration spending cut.

 The last Congress enacted more than $2.5 trillion of deficit reduction. Counting interest savings, over $1.7 trillion was from discretionary spending cuts – about 70 percent – while only about $750 billion (counting interest savings) was from increased revenue.

 It is critical that plans to replace the sequester utilize a balanced approach, including revenues and mandatory spending cuts, that protect education and other nondefense discretionary (NDD) programs from further spending cuts.

These sequestration cuts would chop funding for programs in the Department of Education by $2.5 billion. In addition, Head Start would be cut by $398 million. This would be the largest cut EVER to education programs. Sequestration would move us backwards, by slashing Department of Education non-Pell grant discretionary funding below the Fiscal Year (FY) 2004 level.

To view more, click here

STOP THE CUTS!

March 22, 2012  |  No Comments  |  by Broddy  |  Charts and Factsheets

    

Updated February 10, 2012

STOP THE LARGEST EDUCATION FUNDING CUTS EVER!!

  • Unless Congress acts, on January 2, 2013 all federally-funded education programs (other than Pell grants) will be subject to a 9.1% automatic across-the-board cut.D[i]D
  • These cuts (called “sequestration” in federal jargon) would chop funding for programs in the Department of Education by over $4.1 billion. In addition, Head Start would be cut by $725 million. This would be the largest cut EVER to education programs.
  • Additional cuts to education programs (including Pell grants) will likely occur in Fiscal Years 2014 through 2021 due to stringent “caps” on so-called discretionary-funded programs, which include all education programs (other than student loans) and Head Start.
  • Critical programs including Title I aid to high-poverty schools; IDEA funds for students with disabilities; Impact Aid; teacher quality grants; after-school grants; charter and magnet school aid; English Language Acquisition grants; career, technical and adult education; campus-based student aid; aid to minority-serving institutions; TRIO and GEAR UP will all be slashed. Some examples:
  • These across-the board cuts result from Congress’ failure last year to enact at least $1.2 trillion in deficit reduction, as required by the Budget Control Act. Because Congress was unable to adopt a balanced deficit reduction plan that included both revenues and spending cuts, the entire $1.2 trillion will now be taken out of discretionary-funded programs.
  • These cuts will be on top of education cuts adopted by Congress last year. Funding for education programs (exclusive of changes to Pell grants) was cut in the aggregate by $1.25 billion (-2.7%) in Fiscal Year (FY) 2011, which generally provides funds to schools and colleges for the 2011-2012 school year.The FY 2012 omnibus appropriations bill cut aggregate funding for the Department of Education by an additional $233 million. Between FY 10 and FY 12 more than 50 education programs totaling $1.2 billion have had their funding completely eliminated.
  • These cuts will be particularly disruptive to schools because some of the cuts will take effect in January 2013 – the middle of the 2012-13 school year.
  • Cuts of this magnitude will be harmful to jobs and the economy. A person with a Bachelor’s degree has lifetime earnings more than twice as much as a high school dropout, benefitting not only those individuals and their families, but our society and government by paying higher taxes and relying less on social services. 
  •  What you can do to stop these cuts:
    • Prepare an analysis of the impact to your state/school district/school/college of a 9.1% cut in your federal education funds.
    • Share that result with your members of Congress and urge them to stop the largest education cuts in history and to stop reducing the deficit on the backs of students, schools and colleges. See: http://house.gov/ and http://www.senate.gov/general/contact_information/senators_cfm.cfm  for a list of Representatives and Senators.
    • Share what you send and any responses with the Committee for Education Funding: Rmendoza@cef.org

 

  • Title I would be cut by $1.3 billion, adversely affecting services to more than 1.7 million educationally disadvantaged children.
    • IDEA special education would be cut by over $1 billion affecting 536,000 students with disabilities.
    • Funding for teacher quality grants would be cut by $225 million.
    • While Pell grants is exempt from sequestration in FY 13, other student financial aid programs such as Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants and Work-Study would be cut by $156 million, reducing aid to            more than 2 million students.
    • TRIO and GEAR UP will cut by a combined $104 million, curtailing services to over 145,000 students.
    • Career, Technical and Adult Education would be cut by $158 million, harming more than 1.6 million students.
    • Overall, these education cuts would jeopardize almost 90,000 education jobs.

 

House and Senate ESEA program Bills

January 12, 2012  |  No Comments  |  by Broddy  |  Charts and Factsheets

 

Click here to view PROGRAMS AUTHORIZED IN ESEA BILLS INTRODUCED BY EDUCATION AND THE WORKFORCE COMMITTEE CHAIRMAN KLINE

Click here to view PROGRAMS AUTHORIZED IN ESEA BILL AS REPORTED BY SENATE HELP COMMITTEE

 

 

FY 12 House Appropriations

October 10, 2011  |  No Comments  |  by Broddy  |  Charts and Factsheets

FY 12 House Appropriations: The text of and accompanying tables for the DRAFT House version of the FY 12 Labor-HHS-Education Appropriations bill were released today: Appropriations Committee Releases the Draft Fiscal Year 2012 Labor, Health and Human Services Funding Bill.

To see CEF’s comparison chart click here.

The bill text is at: http://appropriations.house.gov/UploadedFiles/FY_2012_Final_LHHSE.pdf

The detailed funding table is at: http://appropriations.house.gov/UploadedFiles/FY12LH_Detail_SC_10_Rev_with_comparable.pdf

It is not clear whether the Subcommittee will hold a markup.

Rep. DeLauro issued a response, critical of the bill, which has many policy riders. See: DELAURO RESPONDS TO REHBERG DRAFT OF LABOR, HEALTH AND EDUCATION APPROPRIATIONS BILL

Overall, the bill reduces funding for ED by $2.378 billion (-3.3%). Note that the Committee table is not totally comparable to ED’s tables.

Six programs are increased (the only one of these increased by the Senate was Indian ED):

  • Title I grants to LEAS = +$1 billion (+6.9%)
  • Impact Aid Basic Support Payments = +$35 million (+3.1%)
  • Rural Education = +$25.5 million (+14.6%)
  • Indian Education = +$5 million (+3.9%)
  • IDEA Part B State grants = +$1.223 billion (+10.7%)
  • Regional Education Labs = +$12.1 million (+21.1%)

31 programs are eliminated

  • School Improvement Grants = -$534.6 million
  • High School Graduation Initiative = -$48.9 million
  • Mathematics and Science Partnerships = -$175.1 million
  • Foreign Language Assistance = -$26.9 million – also eliminated in Senate bill
  • Race to the Top = -$698.6 million
  • Investing in Innovation Fund = -$149.7 million
  • Teaching of Traditional American History = -$45.9 million
  • School Leadership = -$29.2 million
  • Arts in Education = -$27.4 million
  • Excellence in economic education = -$1.4 million – also eliminated in Senate bill
  • FIE programs of national Significance = -$12 million
  • Ready-to-Learn television = -$27.2 million
  • Advanced Placement = -$43.3 million
  • Promise Neighborhoods = -$29.9 million
  • Alcohol Abuse Reduction = -$6.9 million – also eliminated in Senate bill
  • Elementary and Secondary School Counseling = -$52.4 million
  • Carol M. White Physical Education Program = -$78.8 million
  • Civic Education = -$1.2 million – also eliminated in Senate bill
  • Special Olympics Education programs = -$8.1 million
  • Vocational rehabilitation Demonstration and Training programs = – $6.5 million
  • Vocational rehabilitation Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers = -$1.9 million
  • Strengthening Predominantly Black Institutions = -$9.6 million
  • Strengthening Asian American Pacific Islander Institutions = -$3.2 million
  • Strengthening Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian-Serving Institutions = -$13.4 million
  • Strengthening Native American-Serving Nontribal Institutions = -$3.2 million
  • Strengthening Tribal Colleges = -$26.8 million
  • International Education and Foreign Language Overseas Programs =
    -$7.5 million
  • Institute for International Public Policy = -$1.6 million
  • Fund for the Improvement of Postsec. Ed. (FIPSE) = -$18.6 million
  • Postsecondary Program for Students with Intellectual = -$11 million
  • Javits Fellowships = -$8.1 million

Nine programs are cut:

  • Title I Evaluation = -$3.2 million (-38.7%)
  • State Grants for Improving Teacher Quality = -$24.7 million (-1%)
  • Education for Native Hawaiians = -$14.2 million (-41.6%)
  • Alaska Native Education Equity = -$6.2 million (-18.8%)
  • Comprehensive Centers = -$43.2 million (-84.4%)
  • Safe and Drug-Free Schools National Programs = -$54.2 million (-45.5%)
  • Pell Grants = -$2.303 billion (-10.0%), but maintains the $5,550 maximum award. Note there are several amendments to the HEA concerning Pell grants included the bill that result in this cost reduction.  See below.
  • Hispanic Serving Institutions = -$87 million (-83.3%)
  • Strengthening Historically Black Colleges (HBCUs) =-$85 million
    (-35.9%)

Higher Education Policy Changes:

Sec. 307: Policy rider blocking implementation of the Gainful Employment regulations published on October 29, 2010 and June 13, 2011.

Sec. 308: Blocks implementation/enforcement of the regulation relating to State authorization and defining “credit Hour”.

Sec. 309:  Makes numerous changes to Pell grant eligibility which result in reduced cost for the program, including:

  • Eliminating eligibility for less-than half-time students
  • Restricting eligibility to receive a minimum Pell grant
  • Lowering the period of time for total Pell eligibility from 18 semesters to 12 semesters
  • Changing the income protection allowances
  • Lowering the family income that results in an automatic Zero Expected Family Contribution
  • Changing the definition of untaxed income
  • Eliminating students who are not high school graduates from receiving a Pell grant.
  • All of those changes take effect on July 12, 2012

Other programs

  • In HHS, Head Start is increased by $540 million
  • In DOL, job training programs are severely cut, including the elimination of the $125 million Workforce Innovation Fund
  • All National and Community Service programs are eliminated, including AmeriCorps. Total cut  = $-474 million
  • The Institute of Museum And Library Services is cut by $11 million (-4.6%)

 

The Budget Control Act: Caps, Cuts, and Sequesters

September 8, 2011  |  No Comments  |  by Broddy  |  Charts and Factsheets

To watch Joel’s presentation, click here.