Education Matters 2017 and Resources

March 31, 2016  |  No Comments  |  by Brenda Arredondo  |  Uncategorized

Download “Education Matters”

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CEF’s annual Education Budget Response is the most comprehensive source available on how vital federal education programs improve the lives of millions of Americans.

The Budget Response is a useful source for information on federal education programs, but there are resources even more valuable: the authors and contacts listed within, who invite you to find out more about the programs described here and the lives of the people these programs touch.


Click the image to download the Education Matters presentation.

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Letter in strong opposition to the Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 Budget Resolution proposed by Chairman Price

March 15, 2016  |  No Comments  |  by Brenda Arredondo  |  Charts and Factsheets, Letters to Congress

Download the PDF here.

March 15, 2016

Dear Budget Committee Member:

The Committee for Education Funding (CEF), a coalition of 116 national education associations and institutions spanning early learning to postgraduate education, writes to express our strong opposition to the Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 Budget Resolution proposed by Chairman Price.

While the proposed Budget maintains the FY 2017 cap for nondefense discretionary (NDD) spending, it proposes to slash funding for education and other critical NDD programs by $877 billion, or 18.6 percent, between FY 2018 and FY 2026.

In FY 2018 alone, it cuts NDD programs by $44 billion (-8.5 percent) below the sequester cap.  Compared to the current Fiscal Year, it cuts NDD by $55 billion      (-10.4 percent), when the $8 billion provided for NDD through the Overseas Contingency Operations fund is factored in.

The materials released on the Chairman’s proposed budget do not provide any details on funding for discretionary-funded education programs.  However, if the 10.4 percent cut to NDD below current levels was applied equally to all programs, funding for critical Department of Education programs would be cut by $7.1 billion with Head Start in the Department of Health and Human Services cut by $953 million. Such cuts would devastate programs serving students from preschool to postgraduate education, as well as in related areas of workforce training, libraries and museums. In addition, the budget proposes to freeze the maximum Pell grant award for at least the next ten years.

Making matters worse, the Budget includes $202 billion in mandatory cuts over ten years in Function 500 (Education, Employment, Training, and Social Services).  While the materials do not specify what those cuts are, we are deeply concerned they likely will result in additional reductions to mandatory-funded student financial aid programs.

At a time when increased educational attainment is strongly tied to earnings, such cuts would be harmful not only to students and their families, schools, colleges, and States, but also to our nation’s economy.

We again strongly urge you to reject this Budget, which reverses recent bipartisan progress in restoring past budget cuts, and would move our nation backwards in efforts to improve school readiness, close achievement gaps, fulfill modern workforce needs, and increase high school graduation, college attendance, and college completion.

Sincerely,

Makese Motley
President

Joel Packer
Executive Director

 

HBR Chart March 2016

CEF Statement on FY 2017 Budget

February 20, 2016  |  No Comments  |  by Brenda Arredondo  |  Press Releases

Click here to download the PDF.

FOR IMMEDIATE DISTRIBUTION         

February 12, 2016

CONTACT:

Joel Packer, CEF Executive Director
JPacker@cef.org
202-383-0083
202-255-0915
 (cell)

 

The Committee for Education Funding Pleased the President’s Budget Invests in Education Despite Constrained Fiscal Environment

Disappointed in Proposed Freeze for Many Key Programs

 

WASHINGTON – The Committee for Education Funding (CEF), a coalition of 124 national education associations and institutions from preschool to postgraduate education, is pleased that President Obama’s Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 budget continues to invest in education, despite the very constrained fiscal environment, due to the FY 2017 freeze for nondefense discretionary programs.

The Budget increases funding for the Department of Education by $1.3 billion. In addition, early learning programs in the Department of Health and Human Services, including Preschool Development grants, Head Start and the Child Care and Development Block Grant, would receive a combined increase of $734 million.

Makese Motley, President of CEF said, “We are deeply disappointed that the budget freezes funding for key foundational education programs including IDEA state grants, the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) Title II Supporting Effective Instruction, Impact Aid, Rural Education, Career and Technical Education State grants, Adult Education State grants, Federal Supplemental Educational opportunity grants, Federal Work Study, TRIO, GEAR UP, aid to HBCUs, HSIs, and other minority-serving institutions.”

CEF also pointed out that while Title I funding is proposed to increase by $450 million, in reality that is a freeze at the combined FY 2016 level for Title I and School Improvement Grants (SIG).  The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) absorbed SIG into Title I and increased the school improvement set-aside from 4% to 7%.  Thus, $200 million will be cut from school district allocations, resulting in many school districts receiving a smaller initial Title I allocation than they did in FY 2016. 

CEF also noted that while the Student Support and Academic Enrichment grants created in ESSA is funded above the combined FY 2016 appropriation level of programs that were consolidated into it, its proposed funding is less than one-third of its $1.65 billion authorized level that was established in that bipartisan bill, even though the activities under the new block grant are far broader than those funded under the programs that were absorbed into it.

CEF is pleased that some currently authorized programs received modest increases, including education for homeless children, Promise Neighborhoods, Education Innovation and Research, school leaders, magnet schools, IDEA preschool and infants/families, and research and statistics.  In addition, the Budget proposes $139 billion in new mandatory funding over ten years for programs such as Preschool for All, Computer Science for All, and America’s College Promise.

At the higher education level, CEF supports the proposed expanded eligibility for Pell grants through the proposed Pell for Accelerated Completion, the Pell bonus, and other improvements.

CEF is strongly opposed to the proposed cuts to 21st Century Community Learning Centers, Impact Aid payments for federal property, International education, Library Services State grants, and the elimination of Teacher Quality Partnerships.

“We are fully supportive of the president’s plan to finally eliminate the harmful sequester caps and cuts in Fiscal Year 2018 and beyond, that make it extremely difficult to provide needed investments in education and related programs,” CEF Executive Director Joel Packer noted.

“CEF looks forward to working with Congress on a bipartisan basis to ensure that key education programs receive the increases desperately needed to help ensure that all students come to school ready to learn, close achievement gaps, improve overall student achievement, and increase high school graduation, college access, and college completion rates,” said Motley. “When our students succeed our nation succeeds.”


About the Committee for Education Funding

 Founded in 1969, the Committee for Education Funding (CEF) and its 100+ member organizations have worked toward the common goal of maximizing federal support for our nation’s education system. Nonpartisan and nonprofit, CEF is America’s largest education coalition, reflecting the broad spectrum of the education community. 

Chart: PELL GRANT PROGRAM DISCRETIONARY FUNDING NEEDED TO MAINTAIN A DISCRETIONARY MAXIMUM AWARD OF $4,860

February 2, 2016  |  No Comments  |  by Brenda Arredondo  |  Charts and Factsheets, Resources, Uncategorized

PELL GRANT PROGRAM DISCRETIONARY FUNDING NEEDED TO MAINTAIN A DISCRETIONARY MAXIMUM AWARD OF $4,860

(Click to download the PDF)

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FISCAL YEAR 2016 DISCRETIONARY FUNDING MATERIALS

January 4, 2016  |  No Comments  |  by Brenda Arredondo  |  Uncategorized

Click below to view and download “Fiscal Year 2016 Discretionary Funding For Selected Department Of Education And Related Programs”

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Click below to view charts which provide yearly Budget Authority funding levels between Fiscal Year (FY) 2002 and FY 2016 for major discretionary funded programs the U.S. Department of Education (ED) and Head Start in the Department of Health and Human Services.
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Raise the Caps!

September 10, 2015  |  No Comments  |  by Brenda Arredondo  |  Uncategorized

Letter to Congress from 2,500 Organizations Seeking Sequestration Relief (Sep. 10, 2015)

Click below to download a PDF of CEF’s NDD Education Toolkit for education programs, including background info and quick facts can be used in blogs, op-eds, action alerts, and social media!
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CEF’s NDD Education Toolkit for education programs

September 10, 2015  |  No Comments  |  by Brenda Arredondo  |  Charts and Factsheets, Resources

Click below to download a PDF of CEF’s NDD Education Toolkit for education programs, including background info and quick facts can be used in blogs, op-eds, action alerts, and social media!
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CEF Membership Directory (September 2015 Update)

September 2, 2015  |  No Comments  |  by Brenda Arredondo  |  Resources

To see contact information for each organization, please download the 2015 CEF Membership Directory (updated September 2015)

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CEF’s letter in opposition to the Fiscal Year (FY) 2016 Labor-HHS-Education Appropriations bill (June 24)

June 24, 2015  |  No Comments  |  by Brenda Arredondo  |  Uncategorized

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CEF Board of Directors - 2015

June 24, 2015

Dear Appropriations Committee Member:

The Committee for Education Funding (CEF), a coalition of 118 national education associations and institutions spanning early learning to postgraduate education, writes to express our strong opposition to the Fiscal Year (FY) 2016 Labor-HHS-Education Appropriations bill as reported from subcommittee.

The fundamental problem with this bill, as well as other appropriations bills, is that they are based on the sequester level cap, which in the aggregate essentially freezes funding for nondefense discretionary (NDD) programs. The only way to provide education and related programs with the investments they so desperately need is for Congress to reach a bipartisan agreement that raises the caps, similar to the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2013 that was negotiated by Sen. Murray and Rep. Paul Ryan. Due to the virtual FY 2016 freeze on NDD and the fact that the committee increased funding for several other subcommittees, this bill required a cut of $3.6 billion below the FY 2015 level.

While we appreciate that Subcommittee Chairman Blunt and the subcommittee provided increases for a small number of education programs including Head Start ($100 million), Title I ($125 million), and IDEA State grants ($125 million), overall the bill sharply reduces funding for education programs by $1.7 billion. Compared to the President’s budget, it cuts the Department of Education by $5.3 billion.

The bill eliminates ten education programs including striving readers, preschool development grants, Investing in Innovation, school leadership, the physical education program, First in the World, and the Child Care Access Means Parents in School program.

In addition, it cuts funding for more than 40 other programs, including School Improvement State grants ($56 million), Teacher Quality State grants ($103 million), 21st century community learning centers ($117 million), elementary and secondary school counseling ($27 million), English Language Acquisition ($25 million), adult education State grants ($29 million), Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants ($29 million), and Federal Work-Study ($40 million).

Further it rescinds $300 million for FY 2015 Pell grant funding. While this will not adversely affect the Pell grant maximum award for the 2016-17 school year, it will likely result in a Pell funding shortfall in FY 2017.

Several other education programs are frozen including Impact Aid, rural education, TRIO and GEAR UP.

The need to increase the federal investment in education has never been greater. Jobs and the economy are directly linked to and enhanced by such investments. Both unemployment rates and lifetime earnings are closely connected to levels of education attainment.

Solving our nation’s fiscal situation and reducing the debt can’t and won’t happen simply by slashing education and other nondefense discretionary spending. We urge you to reject this bill and instead to start bipartisan negotiations that raise the caps on NDD spending so that the Labor-HHS-Education Subcommittee receives a larger allocation that will allow it to produce a bill that invests in education and our nation’s future.

Sincerely,

Noelle Ellerson, President

Joel Packer, Executive Director